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Calubian

Calubian, situated along the coast in Leyte province within the Eastern Visayas region of the Philippines, spans an area of 100.95 square kilometers and was home to 31,646 individuals according to the 2020 census. It encompasses 53 barangays. In 2016, Calubian's annual regular revenue amounted to ₱ 80,836,473.98. The population density is calculated at 313 residents per square kilometer.


On January 8, 1919, the town of Calubian was established by Governor-General Charles E. Yeater through Executive Order No. 4. Initially known as Eulalia, the town was formerly a district of the Municipality of Leyte, Leyte and was renamed Calubian due to its extensive coconut plantation.

The local government of Calubian was set up on January 22, 1919, with Felix Garganera as the inaugural town executive. He was succeeded by Nepumoceno Torlao in 1922, followed by Alejandro Baronda who served as Local Chief Executive from 1931 to 1934. Felix Lafuente took over from 1934 to 1937, succeeded by Francisco Enage from 1938 to 1940, and then Enrique Q. Enage from 1941 to 1942. Lorenzo Mendoza led the town from 1942 to 1944, followed by Honorato Agas Sr. who served from 1945 to April 15, 1986, with a brief break in 1952-1953 when he was defeated by Rosendo Eamiguel.

The People Power Revolution on February 25, 1986, concluded Agas’ term, and Victorio Loygos Sr. was appointed as the OIC Mayor, serving from April 16, 1986, to May 1987. He was succeeded by Rolando R. Amparado, who served from June 24, 1987, to November 30, 1987, and then Marciano Batiancela Jr from December 1, 1987. The newly elected Local Chief Executive, Dr. Carlos C. Cotiangco Jr., took office on February 8, 1988, and made significant contributions to the development of Metro-Calubian, including several infrastructure projects like road concreting, public market construction, municipal hall completion, drainage system improvement, and water works projects.


Historical Overview:

The town of Calubian, originally a barrio of the Municipality of Leyte, Leyte, was established on January 8, 1919, by Governor Charles E. Yeater's Executive Order No. 4. Initially, it was named Eulalia in tribute to a distinguished female resident, but was later renamed Calubian, inspired by the area's extensive coconut plantation.

The local government was set up on January 22, 1919, with Felix Garganera as the first town executive. Over the years, leadership changed hands among several individuals until the EDSA Revolution in 1986, which ended Honorato Agas Sr's long tenure. Following this, various appointed and elected officials served as the Local Chief Executive. The most notable among them was Dr. Carlos C. Cotiangco Jr., who implemented several infrastructure projects during his term.

In the 1992 election, Salvador T. Po, a son of a notable Chinese merchant, was elected as the Local Chief Executive. His death in 2001 led to a succession of leadership changes, with his daughter Hazel R. Po currently serving as the mayor.

Socio-Economic and Biophysical Profile:

Calubian, comprising of 53 barangays, is situated at the eastern end of Leyte's mainland. Its strategic location along a well-protected harbor and 36 kilometers of coastline makes fishing a vital occupation for its residents. The town's climate, classified as the second type by PAGASA, has no dry season and experiences maximum rainfall from November to January.

The municipality has a total land area of 13,760 hectares, with a topography that is gently undulating and rolling. It is home to seven major rivers, which, while providing resources, also pose a flooding risk during heavy rains.

In terms of socio-economics, Calubian experienced a negative growth rate according to the 2000 census, due to high out-migration to urban centers. However, the population increased slightly according to the August 2007 census.

Agricultural Profile:

Calubian is primarily an agricultural town, with 70.67% of its total land area dedicated to agriculture. The main crops grown are coconut, corn, rice, banana, vegetables, and root crops. Corn is the staple food crop of the majority of Calubianons. However, various issues, including diseases and lack of infrastructure, hamper the full exploitation of these crops' potential.

Barangays

Calubian is politically subdivided into 53 barangays. Each barangay consists of puroks and some have sitios.

Abanilla

Anislagan

Bunacan

Cabalquinto

Herrera (Cabalhin)

Cabradilla

Caneja

Cantonghao

Caroyocan

Casiongan

Cristina

Dalumpines

Don Luis

Dulao

Efe (Ul-og)

Enage

Espinosa

Ferdinand E. Marcos

Garganera

Garrido

Guadalupe

Gutosan

Igang

Inalad

Jubay

Juson

Kawayan Bogtong

Kawayanan

Kokoy Romualdez

Labtic

Laray

Limite (Agas)

Manuel Veloso

Mahait

Malobago

Matagok

Nierras

Nipa

Obispo

Pagatpat

Pangpang

Patag

Pates

Pal-og

Padoga

Petrolio

Poblacion

Railes

Tabla

Tagharigue

Tuburan

Villahermosa

Villalon

Villanueva